brief self report inventories

For psychologists, finding out the emotional and physical status of the client is one reason for administering personality assessment instruments. How the client answers questions regarding his or her current state of being can provide the psychologist with self-report data, information individuals report about themselves, which can offer clues to the client’s personality. One way for psychologists to gather self-report data is through the use of surveys, which require direct answers such as the Brief Symptom Inventory or Beck Depression Inventory-II. These assessments are also referred to as brief inventories. How and when might these self-report inventories be helpful to psychologists?

For this Discussion, review this week’s Learning Resources. Consider a situation in which a brief inventory would be appropriate to use with a client and what information it might reveal. Then, think about a situation in which a brief inventory would be inappropriate, or even counterproductive, and why. Finally, reflect on any challenges that might be inherent in relying on self-report data from brief inventories.

With these thoughts in mind:

Write a description of one situation in which a brief inventory would be appropriate and explain why. Then describe one situation in which a brief inventory would be inappropriate or even counterproductive and explain why. Finally, explain at least two challenges inherent in relying on self-report data from brief inventories.

Reference:

Anastasi, A., & Urbina, S. (2009). Psychological testing (7th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

oChapter 13, “Self Report Personality Inventories,” (pp. 348–385)

Asner-Self, K.K., Schreiber, J.B., Marotta, S.A. (2006). A cross-cultural analysis of the Brief Symptom Inventory-18. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology 12(2), 367–375.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.